All About That Bass – Why? Oh why this song! Anything else, but not THIS!

I am proud to say that I have never been a willing participant in hearing this song. If it plays on the radio in my car, I change stations or turn off the radio altogether. It is pedantic, prattling, and in general represents an unrealistic junction between two totally disparate segments of American culture.  And in my not so humble opinion it adds not one iota of benefit to music as an art.

Before people misinterpret what I’m saying about this song.   Continue reading “All About That Bass – Why? Oh why this song! Anything else, but not THIS!”

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Subluxation

Subluxation Dictionary Entry

The sciatic nerve is a major nerve extending from the lower end of the spinal cord down the back of the thigh, and dividing above the knee joint. It is the nerve with the largest diameter in the human body. Since my adolescence I’ve suffered with acute sciatica, a periodic inflammation of the sciatic nerve roots. Sometimes it’s just uncomfortable, but at other times it gets so bad that I can barely walk.  Several times I’ve been in such pain from it that I couldn’t even drive myself to get care. Continue reading “Subluxation”

Preternatural (Praeternatural)

I first encountered this word while in my studies at St. Bens.  It is a word used in metaphysics, the philosophy of nature, and in theology. It is used to define phenomena or events which fall outside of the normal or ‘natural’ but still happening by the agency of some created being (including spiritual beings). Continue reading “Preternatural (Praeternatural)”

Hedychium cryptocoryne

Both words in today’s mashup are plant genii.  The first ‘Hedychium’ is the genus of ginger; it has a quite beautiful flowers.  The second ‘Cryptocoryne’ is a genus of leafy underwater plants favored by aquarium enthusiasts for its bright red leaves, which provide a nice contrast to the bright greens common to most aquarium flora.  Enjoy pictures of both below:

If you missed yesterday’s late night post, check it out at the link below.

Tintinnabulation

Tintinnabulation, a word first coined in 1849 by American poet and author Edgar Allen Poe.  It is a neologism and a portmanteau.  Derived from Latin tinnire – to ring, to tinkle; bulum – affix meaning musical instrument. An onomatopoeia, it means a ringing or tinkling sound.

This word appeared also in the poem “Quietude” by Odin Roark which I shared in yesterday’s post.  This morning, as I woke, I was greeted by ‘tintinnabulation’ in seemingly endless permutations. Continue reading “Tintinnabulation”

Hydrochlorothiazide? | Xerxes

Some days my mind gives me great words like ‘eudaimonia‘ or ‘matriculate’. Today, it decided to give me ‘hydrochlorothiazide’. You may think to yourself, “That sounds dangerous!”  I promise you; it’s not, unless you don’t need it. Continue reading “Hydrochlorothiazide? | Xerxes”

Eudaimonia | Want to be happy?

We tend to forget that happiness doesn’t come as a result of getting something we don’t have, but rather of recognizing and appreciating what we do have.

Words attributed to Frederick Keonig which speaks to a truth behind human happiness – a healthy practice of Gratitude is essential to happiness.

In Book X of the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle says that happiness (eudaimonia) is the end of human nature.  Now when he says ‘end’ he doesn’t mean it in any temporal sense, but in the sense of completion or perfection.  In other words, he says that happiness is to be fully human.  What does that mean, “to be fully human”?  Continue reading “Eudaimonia | Want to be happy?”

Mozart’s Great Symphony in G Minor (40th Symphony) K. 550

Composed during several very productive weeks for Mozart, the 40th Symphony, sometimes referred to as the Great Symphony in G minor, is among two other symphonies which he produced within a six week span.  It is one of only two symphonies Mozart composed in minor keys.  Continue reading “Mozart’s Great Symphony in G Minor (40th Symphony) K. 550”

Helicarnassus

Seven Ancient Wonders

Helicarnassus (Halicarnassus) (modern day Bodrum, Turkey) is an ancient Greek city founded, as best as can be discerned from images of Medusa, Athena, and Poseidon found on its coins, during the Dorian period. These symbols support the hypothesis attributing its founding to Troezen and Argos, Greek cities of the Hexapolis. Inhabitants accepted Anthes, one of Poseidon’s sons, as their founder.

For most, this city brings to mind images of the great Mausoleum, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World; however, by me, it is best known as the birthplace of Herodotus the Greek historian and philosopher. Continue reading “Helicarnassus”